Lesson 267 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences.
Instructions: Combine the following sentences using adverb clauses at the beginning of the sentence.
1. Frank started medical training. He drove a forklift for a living.
2. The rains had started the mud slides. The homes were not safe to live in.
3. Older people love to sit in the park. They feed the birds and visit.
4. I enjoyed camping out. I was much younger.
5. Joe recognized the man. The man had stopped his car to help.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
Several different subordinate conjunctions can be used to combine adverb clauses with independent clauses, but I will only show one possibility.
1. Before Frank started medical training, he drove a forklift for a living.
2. Because the rains had started the mud slides, the homes were not safe to live in.
3. While they feed the birds and visit, older people love to sit in the park.
4. When I was much younger, I enjoyed camping out.
5. After the man had stopped his car to help, Joe recognized him.

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Lesson 266 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences.
Instructions: Combine the following sentences using adverb clauses at the end of the sentence.
1. We watched the robins. They raised their young in our apple tree.
2. Becky read the book. It was recommended by a friend.
3. Dad donates his suits to charity. He has worn them a year.
4. The policemen delayed the drivers. The wrecks were cleared.
5. Ann ate an apple. She studied her vocabulary.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
Several different subordinate conjunctions can be used to combine adverb clauses with independent clauses, but I will only show one possibility.
1. We watched the robins while they raised their young in our apple tree.
2. Becky read the book since it was recommended by a friend.
3. Dad donates his suits to charity after he has worn them a year.
4. The policemen delayed the drivers until the wrecks were cleared.
5. Ann ate an apple as she studied her vocabulary.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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Quiz for Lessons 261 – 265 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.
1. I am hungrier than I thought.
2. We left before the game was over.
3. Lee is older than Bill.
4. While I was waiting for the phone call, I read a book.
5. If you don’t believe me, ask my wife.
6. Are you upset because I didn’t call?
7. The alarm rang while I was in the shower.
8. Open the window so that we can have some fresh air.
9. Paul will take you home when you are ready.
10. You shouldn’t say those things unless you are certain about their validity.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. than I thought modifies the predicate adjective hungrier
2. before the game was over modifies the verb left
3. than Bill (is old) modifies the predicate adjective older
4. While I was waiting for the phone call modifies the verb read
5. If you don’t believe me modifies the verb ask
6. because I didn’t call modifies the predicate adjective upset
7. while I was in the shower modifies the verb rang
8. so that we can have some fresh air modifies the verb open
9. when you are ready modifies the verb will take
10. unless you are certain about their validity modifies the verb should say

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Lesson 265 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.
An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.
Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctionsincluding after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.
Example: They arrived before the game had ended. (“before the game had ended” is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)
Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.
Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).
Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.
1. Ila reads music better than Becky.
2. The dog whined sadly as I walked into the house.
3. If you have time, finish doing the dishes for me.
4. Many operations are unsuccessful because the patient is not careful afterwards.
5. Whenever I go out the door, the dog barks to go also.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. than Becky (can read music well) modifies the adverb better
2. as I walked into the house modifies the verb whined
3. If you have time modifies the verb finish
4. because the patient in not careful afterwards modifies the predicate adjective unsuccessful
5. Whenever I go out the door modifies the verb barks

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The Other Side of the Door: What If

This is a scary movie and this scene is really intriguing. I hope you like it.

What if is usually used in the beginning of a question, when we ask about the consequences of an action. We use what if here to indicate present or future situations.
For example,
What if there is no fish in the ocean? You won’t be able to fish for the family
.
What if I go home earlier? You will miss all the important decisions of the meeting.
Watch the movie segment  and say how the main character would probably answer the question. Follow the examples above.
What if I could bring your son back to you just one more time?
What if I could give you the chance to say your final goodbye?

Work in pairs: Think about two possible answers.
Make a guess based on the evidence provided by the segment: What if she opens the door?

1. ________________________ 
2. ________________________ 
What about you? How would you react to the offer?


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Lesson 264 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.
An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.
Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctionsincluding after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.
Example: They arrived before the game had ended. (“before the game had ended” is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)
Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.
Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).
Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.
1. Although I became tired, I enjoyed the hike.
2. You cannot become an expert driver until you drive for several years.
3. Buy that coat now because it might be sold tomorrow.
4. I cannot reach the top window unless I have a ladder.
5. After you have eaten lunch, we will leave for New York.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. Although I became tired modifies the verb enjoyed
2. until you drive for several years modifies the verb can become
3. because it might be sold tomorrow modifies the verb buy
4. unless I have a ladder modifies the verb can reach
5. After you have eaten lunch modifies the verb will leave

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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Lesson 263 – Parts of the Sentence – Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.
An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.
Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctionsincluding after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.
Example: They arrived before the game had ended. (“before the game had ended” is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)
Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.
Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).
Instructions: Complete the elliptical adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.
1. My dog is older than I.
2. Jim can run faster than Jeff.
3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards.
4. He is trying as hard as James.
5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. My dog is older than I am old. than I am old modifies the predicate adjective older
2. Jim can run faster than Jeff can run fast. than Jeff can run fastmodifies the adverb faster
3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards accurately. than she keyboards accurately modifies the adverb accurately
4. He is trying as hard as James is trying hard. as James is trying hardmodifies the adverb hard
5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne is a good tennis player. than Jeanne is a good tennis player modifies the adjective better

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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