Lesson 184 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.
1. Do you have a reason for your absence from class?
2. The veterans from the war in Spain remained loyal.
3. The class was delighted by the outcome of the story.
4. Dozens of stories about heroes are in the school library.
5. In the afternoon Henrietta went to the library.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. for your absence modifies “reason” telling what kind/ from class modifies “absence” telling which
2. from the war modifies “veterans” telling which / in Spain modifies “war” telling which
3. by the outcome modifies “was delighted” telling howor why / of the story modifies “outcome” telling which
4. of stories modifies “dozens” telling what kind / about heroes modifies “stories” telling what kind / in the school library modifies “are” telling where
5. in the afternoon modifies “went” telling when / to the library modifies “went” telling where

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/05/lesson-184-parts-of-sentence.html

Lesson 183 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.
1. The real owner of the property is not available for comment.
2. I have no time for your excuses or delays.
3. The manager came for the answer.
4. In this century we are preserving our forests.
5. You will always be one of my best friends.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. of the property modifies “owner” telling which / for comment modifies “available” telling how
2. for your excuses or delays modifies “time” telling what kind
3. for the answer modifies “came” telling why
4. in this century modifies “are preserving” telling when
5. of my best friends modifies “one” telling which

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/05/lesson-183-parts-of-sentence.html

Lesson 182 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.
1. The early settlers were very careless of our forests.
2. We divided the candy among the children at the party.
3. I still live in that stucco house in the next block.
4. The rooms of the house were dark and dreary.
5. The sound of whispers came to us through the window.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. of our forests modifies “careless” telling how
2. among the children modifies “divided” telling how/ at the party modifies either “children” telling whichor “divided” telling where
3. in that stucco house modifies “live” telling where/ in the next block modifies “house” telling which
4. of the house modifies “rooms” telling which
5. of whispers modifies “sound” telling what kind / to us modifies “came” telling where / through the windowmodifies “came” telling how

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/04/lesson-182-parts-of-sentence.html

Lesson 181 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.
1. The boys searched the beach for sand dollars.
2. The grass behind the house and near the fence is dying.
3. A deep ditch was dug near the boundary of the factory.
4. A pretty girl with brown hair and eyes sat near me at the banquet.
5. The three contestants listened carefully to each question.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. for sand dollars modifies “searched” telling why
2. behind the house / near the fence modify “grass” telling which
3. near the boundary modifies “was dug” telling where/ of the factory modifies “boundary” telling which
4. with brown hair and eyes modifies “girl” telling what kind / near me / at the banquet modify “sat” telling where
5. to each question modifies “listened” telling how

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/04/lesson-181-parts-of-sentence.html

Quiz for Lessons 176 – 180 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.
1. A tree with sharp thorns grew beside the wall.
2. The airplane soared above the people on the field.
3. My uncle, the owner of the ranch, rode his horse past the house.
4. We followed the cougar by its tracks in the snow.
5. The bear tumbled over the fence and into some bushes.
6. Tons of wreckage were left after the tornado.
7. The highway wound over a hill and through a beautiful valley.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. with sharp thorns modifies “tree”/ beside the wallmodifies “grew”
2. above the people modifies “soared”/ on the fieldmodifies “people”
3. of the ranch modifies “owner”/ past the housemodifies “rode”
4. by its tracks modifies “followed”/ in the snow modifies either “tracks” (telling which tracks) or “followed” (telling where we followed it)
5. over the fence / into some bushes modify “tumbled”
6. of wreckage modifies “tons”/ after the tornadomodifies “were left”
7. over a hill / through a beautiful valley modify “wound”

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/04/quiz-for-lessons-176-180-parts-of.html

Lesson 180 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A prepositionmust always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.
Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.
These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the prepositionfollowed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.
Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Upwhat? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Downwhat? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.
A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which orwhat kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, andwhy and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.
Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.
1. A number of javalinas appeared at the edge of the forest.
2. In the cage we saw a huge jaguar from the jungles of Brazil.
3. Everyone in the class finished the test at the same time.
4. The children were awakened by a sudden clap of loud thunder.
5. You can go to the Jazz game with us.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. of javalinas modifies the subject “number”/ at the edge modifies the verb “appeared”/ of the forest modifies the object of the preposition “edge”
2. in on cage modifies the verb “saw”/ from the jungles modifies the direct object “jaguar”/ of Brazil modifies the object of the preposition “jungles”
3. in the class modifies the subject “everyone”/ at the same time modifies the verb “finished”
4. by a sudden clap modifies the verb “were awakened”/ of loud thunder modifies the object of the preposition “clap”
5. to the Jazz game/ with us modify the verb “can go”

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/04/lesson-180-parts-of-sentence.html

Lesson 179 – Parts of the Sentence – Prepositional Phrases

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A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A prepositionmust always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.
Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.
These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the prepositionfollowed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.
Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Upwhat? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Downwhat? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.
A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.
Instructions: Pick out the adverb prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.
1. We are proud of the Jazz team and of their record.
2. The dark shadows stretched across the road and the park.
3. On the hill stands an old castle.
4. The employee came for his money.
5. Bill walked down the trail during the rain storm.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. of the Jazz team / of their record modify the predicate adjective “proud”
2. across the road and the park modifies the verb “stretched”
3. on the hill modifies the verb “stands”
4. for his money modifies the verb “came”
5. down the trail / during the rain storm modify the verb “walked”

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2019/04/lesson-179-parts-of-sentence.html