Lesson 289 – Parts of the Sentence – Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let’s now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.
First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.
Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase
You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.
I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs
After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause
I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause
Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.
1. Standing nervously in the wings of the theater, Jeanne practiced her lines quietly and waited to go on stage.
2. The detective searched carefully through the old desk as he recounted in his mind the importance of the will.
3. The small black dog which looked weak and harmless leaped suddenly at the stranger.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. participial phrase
Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater and practiced her lines quietly while she waited to go on stage. = adverb clause
Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater, practiced her lines quietly, and waited to go on stage. = compound verbs
Jeanne who practiced her lines quietly stood nervously in the wings of the theater and waited to go on stage. = adjective clause
2. adverb clause
The detective searched carefully through the old desk, and he recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = compound sentence
Recounting in his mind the importance of the will, the detective searched carefully through the old desk. = participial phrase
The detective who searched carefully through the old desk recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = adjective clause
3. adjective clause
Looking weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = participial phrase
Although he looked weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = adverb clause
The small black dog looked weak and harmless but leaped suddenly at the stranger. = compound verbs

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Lesson 288 – Parts of the Sentence – Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let’s now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.
First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.
Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase
You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.
I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs
After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause
I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause
Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.
1. The engineer knew the train was on time, leaned against the side, and sighed with relief.
2. Hoping to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road.
3. Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake before he returned to the cabin for breakfast.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. compound verbs
Knowing the train was on time, the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = participial phrase
The engineer that knew the train was on time leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = adjective clause
When the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief, he knew the train was on time. = adverb clause
2. participial phrase
The committee for the Olympics hoped to have the seating in place by evening and hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = compound verb
The committee for the Olympics that hoped to have the seating in place by evening hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adjective clause
Because they hoped to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adverb clause
3. adverb clause
Having taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake, Mark returned to the cabin for breakfast. = participial phrase
Mark who had taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake returned to the cabin for breakfast. = adjective clause
Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake and returned to the cabin for breakfast. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://ift.tt/2ihV2Bt

Lesson 287 – Parts of the Sentence – Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let’s now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.
First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.
Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase
You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.
I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs
After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause
I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause
Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.
1. At dusk the manager threw the electrical switch, and the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy.
2. As he walked out on the wire and completed his various routines, the acrobat carefully demonstrated his intricate ability.
3. The people who saw the basketball star surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. compound sentence
Throwing the electrical switch at dusk, the manager lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = participial phrase
At dusk the manager who threw the electrical switch lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = adjective clause
After the manager threw the electrical switch, the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy at dusk. = adverb clause
2. participial phrase
When he had demonstrated his intricate ability, the acrobat carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines. = adverb clause
The acrobat demonstrated his intricate ability, carefully walked out on the wire, and completed his various routines. = compound verbs
The acrobat who carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines demonstrated his intricate ability. = adjective clause
3. adjective clause
Seeing the basketball star, the people surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = participial phrase
When the people saw the basketball star, they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = adverb clause
The people saw the basketball star, and they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://ift.tt/2yu6BeZ

Lesson 286 – Parts of the Sentence – Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let’s now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences, or verbs.
First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.
Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase
You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.
I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs
After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause
I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause
Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.
1. Watching the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another.
2. The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly while it chewed on its bit and neighed continually.
3. The pilot climbed into his jet plane, adjusted his helmet, and attached his oxygen pack.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
(My rewrites are only one way that can be used. Other ways may be possible.)
1. participial phrase
John watched the sunset above the mountain, and he noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = compound sentence
While he watched the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adverb clause
John who was watching the sunset above the mountain noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adjective clause
2. adverb clause
The excited horse which pawed the ground rapidly chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = adjective clause
Pawing the ground rapidly, the excited horse chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = participial phrase
The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly, chewed its bit, and neighed continually = compound verbs
3. compound verbs
Climbing into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = participial phrase
After he climbed into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adverb clause
The pilot who climbed into his jet plane adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adjective clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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Sing: WH-Questions

This is one of my favorite movies I have seen this year. You can’t miss it.

Watch the movie segment:
These are a few of the characters of the movie “Sing”. Write questions to the answers below.

1) _________________________________________________ ?
Johnny sings in an alley.
2) __________________________________________________ ?
He sings romantic songs.
3) ___________________________________________________ ?
Rosita sings in the kitchen while she feeds the children.
4) ___________________________________________________ ?
She has many children.
5) ___________________________________________________ ?
Ash plays the guitar.
6) ____________________________________________________ ?
Meena sings very well, but she is very shy.
7) ____________________________________________________ ?
Mike plays the saxophone.

 Talk with a partner.

1) Can you sing well? Can you play a musical instrument?
2) What are your favorite singers and bands?
3) What kind of music do you like?
4) Where do you like to sing?
5) Do you like TV programs, such as The Voice, America’s Got Talent, among other singing contests TV programs?

Key:

1) Where does Johnny sing?
2) What kind of music does Johnny (like to) sing?
3) Where does Rosita sing?
4) How many children does Rosita have?
5) What musical instrument does Ash play?
6) How does Meena sing?
7) What musical instrument does Mike play?

WORKSHEET

MOVIE SEGMENT DOWNLOAD – SING
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Quiz for Lessons 281 – 285 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. We offered whoever caused the accident a chance to confess.
2. The man whose leg was amputated was glad to be alive.
3. The judge is the person to whom you should talk.
4. When the mayor explained his plan, the citizens were pleased.
5. It is unfortunate that you do not agree.
6. The news that thousands had been killed was correct.
7. This house is where your grandmother lived.
8. Why you don’t like him is hard to understand.
9. If you are unable to find it, call me at home.
10. The manager said that everyone would get a raise.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. offered = verb, we = subject, chance = direct object, a = adjective modifying chance, to confess = adjective infinitive used as object complement; (whoever caused the accident) = noun clause used as an indirect object, caused = verb, whoever = noun clause introductory word used as the subject, accident = direct object, the = adjective modifying accident
2. was = verb, man = subject, the = adjective modifying man, glad = predicate adjective modifying man, to be = adverb infinitive modifying glad, alive = predicate adjective to the infinitive to be; (whose leg was amputated) = adjective clause modifying man, was amputated = verb, leg = subject, whose = adjective modifying leg
3. is = verb, judge = subject, person = predicate nominative, the = adjective modifying judge, the = adjective modifying person; to whom you should talk = adjective prepositional phrase modifying person, (whom you should talk) = noun clause used as the object of the preposition, should talk = verb, you = subject, whom = noun clause introductory word used as the direct object
4. were pleased = verb, citizens = subject, the = adjective modifying citizens; (when the mayor explained his plan) = adverb clause modifying were pleased, explained = verb, mayor = subject, plan = direct object, the = adjective modifying mayor, his = adjective modifying plan, when = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
5. is = verb, it = subject, unfortunate = predicate adjective modifying it; (that you do not agree) = adverb clause modifying unfortunate, do agree = verb, you = subject, not = adverb modifying do agree, that = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
6. was = verb, news = subject, correct = predicate adjective modifying news, the = adjective modifying news; (that thousands had been killed) = noun clause used as an appositive, had been killed = verb, thousands = subject, that = noun introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence
7. is = verb, house = subject, this = adjective modifying house; (where your grandmother lived) = noun clause used as a predicate nominative, lived = verb, grandmother = subject, your = adjective modifying grandmother, where = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying lived
8. is = verb; (why you don’t like him) = noun clause used as the subject, do like = verb, you = subject, him = direct object, n’t = adverb modifying do like, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying do like; hard = predicate adjective modifying the noun clause, to understand = adverb infinitive modifying hard
9. call = verb, (you understood) = subject, me = direct object, at home = adverb prepositional phrase modifying call, at = preposition, home = object of the preposition; (if you are unable to find it) = adverb clause modifying call, are = verb, you = subject, unable = predicate adjective modifying you, to find = adverb infinitive modifying unable, it = direct object to the infinitive, if = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
10. said = verb, manager = subject, the = adjective modifying manager; (that everyone would get a raise) = noun clause used as the direct object, would get = verb, everyone = subject, raise = direct object, a = adjective modifying raise, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
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Lesson 285 – Parts of the Sentence – Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.
If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, orverbal phrase modify.
If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.
1. Now I understand why you didn’t tell me.
2. Whenever you do well, you will be rewarded.
3. The instrument that he plays is not the French horn.
4. Sam explained how you could save money daily.
5. The man whom I met at the store knew my father.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. understand = verb, I = subject, now = adverb modifying understand; (why you didn’t tell me) = noun clause used as the direct object, did tell = verb, you = subject, me = direct object, n’t = adverb modifying did tell, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying did  tell
2. will be rewarded = verb, you = subject; (whenever you do well) = adverb clause modifying will be rewarded, do = verb, you = subject, well = adverb modifying do, whenever = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause
3. is = verb, instrument = subject, the = adjective modifying instrument, horn = predicate nominative, the/French = adjectives modifying horn; (that he plays) = adjective clause modifying instrument, plays = verb, he = subject, that = adjective clause introductory word used as a direct object
4. explained = verb, Sam = subject; (how you could save money daily) = noun clause used as the direct object, could save = verb, you = subject, money = direct object, how/daily = adverbs modifying could save
5. knew = verb, man = subject, father = direct object, my = adjective modifying father, the = adjective modifying man; (whom I met at the store) = adjective clause modifying man, met = verb, I = subject, whom = adjective clause introductory word used as the direct object to met, at the store = adverb prepositional phrase modifying met, at = preposition, store = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying store

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://ift.tt/1BHeG8C. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://ift.tt/2ykO84b